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Johns Hopkins Teams with Lockheed Martin to Enhance STEM Programming for PreK-12th Grade Students


The Johns Hopkins University and Lockheed Martin today announced a partnership aimed at enhancing opportunities for Baltimore City public school students pursuing academic and career fields in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). The collaboration is designed to close the STEM gap that exists primarily in Pre-K through 12th grade. Through the partnership with the university’s Whiting School of Engineering, Lockheed Martin will contribute financial support, staff engagement, and technical assessment expertise to the engineering school’s Center for Educational Outreach, a team of scientists, engineers, and educators dedicated to inspiring and preparing Pre-K through 12th grade students to pursue STEM … Continue reading

ICTR in the News: Smartphone App Successfully Promotes Child Car Safety


The following article profiles work performed by ICTR researcher Andrea C. Gielen, ScD, professor and director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy at the Bloomberg School. Clinical trial finds that parents reported safer child car seat practices after using innovative new app A smartphone app designed to promote proper child car seat use among parents proved effective in a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The Bloomberg School researchers and their colleagues developed the interactive app, Safety in Seconds v2.0, and tested it in a randomized, controlled trial involving more than 700 participants. … Continue reading

ICTR in the News: Engineering Students Devise Blood-Clotting ‘Super Gel’ That Could Make Oft-Repeated Procedures More Efficient and Economical


The following article profiles work performed in part by ICTR researcher Christos Georgiades, a medical doctor and director of interventional oncology at Johns Hopkins Medicine. A simple way to stop the bleeding Article By: Sukanya Charuchandra Stemming the flow of blood to starve a tumor or stop hemorrhage can be an expensive, repetitive task for doctors, requiring a variety of approaches and materials for different patients and different sized blood vessels. Often the interventional radiologists who perform these important procedures must try several times in order to successfully stop the bleeding. A team of students from Johns Hopkins University’s Department … Continue reading

ICTR in the News: When There’s an Audience, People’s Performance Improves


The following article profiles work performed by ICTR researcher Vikram Chib, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Johns Hopkins and the Kennedy Krieger Institute. Often people think performing in front of others will make them mess up, but a new study led by a Johns Hopkins University neuroscientist found the opposite: being watched makes people do better. When people know they are being observed, parts of the brain associated with social awareness and reward invigorate a part of the brain that controls motor skills, improving their performance at skilled tasks. The findings, which could help people become more effective … Continue reading

ICTR in the News: Five Johns Hopkins Scientists Among 83 Who Will Share in $15 Million Award From Chan Zuckerberg Initiative to Fund Computer-Based Research on Human Cells


The following article profiles research funding awarded to ICTR researchers Elana Fertig, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Oncology, and Kasper Hansen, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biostatistics. Five Johns Hopkins scientists, with specialties spanning computation, genetics, statistics and engineering, are among 83 others from 53 institutions in the U.S and eight other countries, who will share in a $15 million award from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative. The award, which is called Collaborative Computational Tools for the Human Cell Atlas, has been given to scientists who will develop open access tools that use computing, algorithms and other ways to visualize, collect and analyze … Continue reading

ICTR in the News: Johns Hopkins Gene Hunter Elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences


The following article profiles the election of ICTR researcher Steven Salzberg, Ph.D. to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Johns Hopkins scientist Steven Salzberg, Ph.D., known for his ability to tackle the most difficult projects in genome sequencing, has been elected as a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He joins the group of 213 scientists, scholars, writers, artists and other leaders, including former President Barack Obama and Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, who make up the class of 2018. Salzberg and his team have led sequencing efforts on a huge variety of species, from viruses … Continue reading

ICTR in the News: Safety Measures Could Save 250,000 Lives a Year in Low and Middle Income Countries


The following article profiles work performed in part by ICTR researcher Adnan A. Hyder, MD, director of Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit and a professor in the Bloomberg School’s Department of International Health. Peer review identifies most effective injury interventions covering 84 countries Interventions such as speeding enforcement and formal swimming lessons for young children could potentially save more than 250,000 lives a year if they were implemented across populations living in extreme poverty in low- and middle-income countries, according to a new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The review found the most successful … Continue reading

A Foodborne Illness Outbreak Could Cost a Restaurant Millions, Study Suggests


Foodborne outbreaks can compromise a restaurant’s annual profits, markedly outweighing preventative costs A single foodborne outbreak could cost a restaurant millions of dollars in lost revenue, fines, lawsuits, legal fees, insurance premium increases, inspection costs and staff retraining, a new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests. The findings, which will be published online on Apr. 16 in the journal Public Health Reports, are based on computer simulations that suggest a foodborne illness outbreak can have large, reverberating consequences regardless of the size of the restaurant and outbreak. According to the model, a fast food restaurant could … Continue reading

ICTR in the News: Direct Electrical Current Used to Preferentially Inhibit Pain-Transmitting Neurons


The following article profiles work performed by ICTR researchers Gene Fridman, Ph.D., M.S., assistant professor of otolaryngology—head and neck surgery and biomedical engineering at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and Yun Guan, M.D., Ph.D., an associate professor of anesthesiology, critical care medicine and neurological surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Using computer models and laboratory rats, Johns Hopkins researchers have demonstrated that “direct electrical current” can be delivered to nerves preferentially, blocking pain signals while leaving other sensations undisturbed. The researchers say the experiments advance the search for improved implantable devices able to treat chronic … Continue reading

ICTR in the News: Why Don’t Kids Use Their Asthma Medicines? Children, Caregivers and Clinicians Disagree on the Answer


The following article profiles work performed by ICTR researcher Tina Cheng, M.D., M.P.H., co-director of Johns Hopkins Children’s Center. In a new analysis of interviews conducted with children who have asthma, their caregivers and their clinicians, Johns Hopkins researchers found that there was significant lack of agreement about why the kids miss their needed daily anti-inflammatory medication. A report on the findings, published in the Journal of Asthma on Feb. 8, 2018, highlights the need for improved communication among patients, families and pediatric clinicians, according to Carolyn Arnold, a medical student at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and … Continue reading

ICTR in the News: Increase in Prehospital Deaths Over the Past Decade Points to Intensifying Violence


The following article profiles work performed in part by ICTR researchers Elliott R. Haut, Ambar Mehta, and David T. Efron. Patients were four times more likely to die from gunshot wounds, nearly nine times more likely to die from stab wounds before getting to a trauma center in 2014, compared to 2007 Article By: Chanapa Tantibanchachai A new Johns Hopkins Medicine analysis of national trauma data shows that trauma patients were four times more likely to die from gunshot wounds and nearly nine times more likely to die from stab wounds before getting to a trauma center in 2014, compared … Continue reading