feed-icon-14x14News

Number of Obese Years Not — Just Obesity — A Distinct Risk Factor for Heart Damage


In an analysis of clinical data collected on more than 9,000 people, Johns Hopkins researchers have shown that the number of years spent overweight or obese appear to “add up” to a distinct risk factor that makes those with a longer history of heaviness more likely to test positive for a chemical marker of so-called “silent” heart damage than those with a shorter history. The researchers say the findings suggest that maintaining a healthy weight across the lifespan is important for keeping the heart healthy and minimizing damage as people age. The authors caution that their study wasn’t designed to … Continue reading

ICTR in the News: Hospital Charges For Outpatient Cancer Care Highly Variable, Medicare Billing Records Show


Martin Makary, M.D., M.P.H., a cancer surgeon and professor of health policy at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Researchers call for “standard pricing” legislation to reduce financial burdens of vulnerable patients An analysis of recent Medicare billing records for more than 3,000 hospitals across the United States shows that charges for outpatient oncology services such as chemo infusion or radiation treatment vary widely and exceed what Medicare will pay by twofold to sixfold. A report of the findings, published in the American Journal of Managed Care on Feb. 17, emphasizes the need for fair and transparent pricing of … Continue reading

ICTR in the News: Parental Enrollment in Medicaid Yields Increase in Preventive Health Care for Children


The following article profiles work performed by ICTR researcher Maya Venkataramani, an assistant professor of general internal medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Expanding Medicaid to cover more low-income parents has an observable spillover effect: more kids get immunizations, checkups Article By: Chanapa Tantibanchachai Enrolling in Medicaid may have health benefits not only for low-income parents but also for their children, according to a Johns Hopkins analysis of more than 50,000 parent-child pairs. In the study, based on survey data, the investigators found that children of low-income parents enrolled in Medicaid had a 29 percent higher probability … Continue reading

Submit Your Clinical Problem to the Johns Hopkins Center for Bioengineering Innovation & Design


The Johns Hopkins Center for Bioengineering Innovation & Design is soliciting clinical needs for their undergraduate design teams.  Submissions are due by Tuesday, March 6.  If selected, a team of 5-8 undergraduate engineers and medtech design and commercialization experts, will work to find a solution to your problem. For more information and to submit a question, visit: https://cbid.bme.jhu.edu/partners/sponsor-a-project/

Report: 1,500 Lives Saved by WHO-Led Trauma Response in Battle of Mosul


WHO’s role, a first, highlights challenges humanitarian organizations face when called upon to provide trauma care in wartime The Battle of Mosul was one of the largest urban sieges since World War II. From October 2016 to July 2017, Iraqi and Kurdish forces fought to retake Iraq’s second largest city, which had fallen to ISIL in 2014. They were backed by U.S.-led coalition forces. More than 940,000 civilians fled during the siege and thousands were injured as they sought safety. When it became clear that the Iraqi forces could not provide the trauma care for civilians during the Battle of Mosul required … Continue reading

NCATS, Karolinska Institutet Scientists Attack Cancer’s Defenses View this email in your browser NCATS, Karolinska Institutet Scientists Attack Cancer’s Defenses


Scientists from NCATS and Sweden’s Karolinska Institutet have developed a potential new approach to fighting cancer by breaking down a defense system used by cancer cells. The defense system involves an enzyme, thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1), which supports cancer cell survival. The research team identified a compound, TRi-1, that stops the activity of the enzyme without causing unwanted side effects, which can be common with existing chemotherapy drugs. When applied to breast and head and neck cancers in mice, TRi-1 killed cancer cells and reduced tumor growth, yet appeared to leave healthy cells and tissues alone. These results, reported Feb. … Continue reading

ICTR in the News: Hearing Loss Linked to Poor Nutrition in Early Childhood, Study Finds


The following article profiles work performed in part by ICTR researcher Susan D Emmett. Both acute and chronic forms of undernutrition in the preschool years are associated with hearing impairment later in life Young adults who were undernourished as preschool children were approximately twice as likely to suffer from hearing loss as their better- nourished peers, a new study suggests. The study, led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, analyzed the relationship between the hearing of more than 2,200 young adults in Nepal and their nutritional levels as children 16 years earlier. The findings suggest that … Continue reading

ICTR in the News: Farmed Seafood and Livestock Stack Up Differently Using Alternate Feed Efficiency Measure


The following article profiles work performed in part by ICTR researcher David C. Love. Study finds retention of protein and calories in feed similar for major aquaculture and livestock species A new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Center for a Livable Future found that, contrary to widely held assumptions, farmed fish and shrimp convert protein and calories in feed to edible seafood at rates similar to livestock (i.e., cattle, pigs, and chickens). The study contributes new insights into what is known as feed conversion efficiency – that is, the efficiency of the process by … Continue reading

ICTR in the News: Low-Tech, Low-Cost Test Strips Show Promise for Reducing Fentanyl Overdoses


The following article profiles work performed by ICTR researcher Susan Sherman, PhD, MPH, professor in the Bloomberg School’s Department of Health, Behavior and Society. The highly accurate strips hold potential for a public health approach to the overdose crisis Fentanyl is one of the most potent forms of opioid, and is often laced into street drugs, making it difficult for street users to ascertain their potency and therefore the potential for overdosing. A study to assess the feasibility of checking illicit street drugs for fentanyl found that low-cost test strips detect the presence of fentanyl with a high degree of accuracy, and … Continue reading

ICTR in the News: Life Expectancy Gains Are Slowing in Both Rich and Poor Countries


The following article profiles work performed by ICTR researcher David Bishai, PhD, professor in the Bloomberg School’s Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health. Increases in human life expectancy have slowed dramatically across the world since 1950, according to a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Although a “ceiling effect” is expected as average lifespan approaches its biological limit, the study found that the trend towards slower gains—and even declines—in lifespan is worst among low-lifespan countries. “This is not about us hitting the ceiling; the slowdown has been sharpest in countries that have the most life … Continue reading

ICTR in the News: Severe, Lingering Symptoms Seen in Some Patients After Lyme Disease Treatment


The following article profiles work performed by ICTR researcher John N. Aucott, associate professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and director of the Johns Hopkins Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center. Johns Hopkins researchers find evidence of prolonged fatigue, depression, and pain for some patients In a study of 61 people treated for the bacteria that causes Lyme disease, Johns Hopkins researchers conclude that fatigue, pain, insomnia, and depression do indeed persist over long periods of time for some people, despite largely normal physical exams and clinical laboratory testing. “Post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS) is a … Continue reading