Tag Archive: News

ICTR in the News: Direct Electrical Current Used to Preferentially Inhibit Pain-Transmitting Neurons


The following article profiles work performed by ICTR researchers Gene Fridman, Ph.D., M.S., assistant professor of otolaryngology—head and neck surgery and biomedical engineering at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and Yun Guan, M.D., Ph.D., an associate professor of anesthesiology, critical care medicine and neurological surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Using computer models and laboratory rats, Johns Hopkins researchers have demonstrated that “direct electrical current” can be delivered to nerves preferentially, blocking pain signals while leaving other sensations undisturbed. The researchers say the experiments advance the search for improved implantable devices able to treat chronic […]

ICTR in the News: Increase in Prehospital Deaths Over the Past Decade Points to Intensifying Violence


The following article profiles work performed in part by ICTR researchers Elliott R. Haut, Ambar Mehta, and David T. Efron. Patients were four times more likely to die from gunshot wounds, nearly nine times more likely to die from stab wounds before getting to a trauma center in 2014, compared to 2007 Article By: Chanapa Tantibanchachai A new Johns Hopkins Medicine analysis of national trauma data shows that trauma patients were four times more likely to die from gunshot wounds and nearly nine times more likely to die from stab wounds before getting to a trauma center in 2014, compared […]

ICTR in the News: Drug Reduces Size of Some Lung Cancer Tumors, Relapse Rate After Surgery


The following article profiles work performed by ICTR researchers Patrick Forde, M.B.B.Ch., a lung cancer oncologist in the Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute of Cancer Immunotherapy, and Drew Pardoll, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Bloomberg-Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy and co-director of the Cancer Immunology Program at the Kimmel Cancer Center. A drug given to early stage lung cancer patients before they undergo surgery showed major tumor responses in the removed tumor and an increase in anti-tumor T-cells that remained after the tumor was removed, which resulted in fewer relapse cases in the patients. The research teams at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute […]

ICTR in the News: Data Show More Prehospital Deaths, a Potential Increase in Intensity of Violence


The following article profiles work performed in part by ICTR researchers Ambar Mehta, Elliott R. Haut, and David T. Efron. A new Johns Hopkins Medicine analysis of national trauma data shows that trauma patients were four times more likely to die from gunshot wounds and nearly nine times more likely to die from stab wounds before getting to a trauma center in 2014, compared with rates in 2007. A report of the findings, published April 3, in the Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, suggests that the increase in prehospital mortality means violence is intensifying. “The data we found […]

Nursing Grad Student Kayla Percy Discusses Her Two Missions with Doctors Without Borders


She speaks as part of the student-run Conversations in Medicine series For Kayla Percy, there wasn’t much time to get her bearings at the camp in South Sudan before she was called to action. On her second day as a nursing supervisor for a small, 35-bed hospital in rebel territory, the International Committee of the Red Cross brought for treatment that same number of injured rebel soldiers—several with gunshot wounds. “We were flooded with patients,” says Percy. “We already had a full in-patient department, so we had to set up tents to get these patients in and start triaging and […]

Faulty Cellular Membrane “Mix” Linked To Parkinson’s Disease


Using human brain cells, researchers piece together the cellular mechanisms that cause plaques to form in the brain Working with lab-grown human brain cells, Johns Hopkins researchers report they have uncovered a much sought-after connection between one of the most common genetic mutations in Parkinson’s disease and the formation of fatty plaques in the brain thought to contribute to the destruction of motor neurons that characterize the disease. The mutation occurs in a gene that holds the code for GBA1, an enzyme that metabolizes fatty molecules in the cell, which make up most of brain cell membranes. The researchers believe […]

ICTR in the News: Scientists Discover a Key Function of ALS-Linked Protein


The following article profiles work performed by ICTR researcher Jiou Wang, MD, PhD, associate professor in the Bloomberg School’s Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Mystery protein FUS revealed to be part of an important gene-activity regulating system in cells The protein FUS, whose mutation or disruption causes many cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), works as a central component of one of the most important regulatory systems in cells, according to a new study in Molecular Cell from scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Precisely what FUS does in cells and why its […]

ICTR in the News: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Launches Cochlear Center for Hearing and Public Health


The following article profiles a new position for ICTR researcher Frank Lin, MD, PhD, an associate professor of Epidemiology and Mental Health at the Bloomberg School and of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at Johns Hopkins Medicine. $10 million gift will provide seed funding for first center of its kind devoted to researching impact of hearing loss on public health, with focus on older adults The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health announces the launch of the Cochlear Center for Hearing and Public Health, a research center that will study the effects of hearing loss, particularly among older adults, with the goal […]

A New Signaling Pathway Involving the Golgi Apparatus Identified in Cells With Huntington’s Disease


Working with cells grown in the lab, Johns Hopkins researchers have identified a biochemical pathway that allows a structure within cells, called the Golgi apparatus, to combat stress caused by free radicals and oxidants. The research team showed that this pathway can be activated by a drug called monensin, which is commonly used as an antibiotic in animal feed. The findings, they say, could help scientists develop new ways to protect cells against the type of oxidative stress linked to Huntington’s disease. Details of the pathway, which involves the response from a series of proteins, are reported in the Jan. […]

ICTR in the News: Link Found Between Pediatric Osteoporosis and Anti-Inflammatory Drugs


The following article profiles work performed in part by ICTR researchers Peisong Gao, Janet Crane and Xu Cao. Mouse study suggests poor childhood bone mass may result from early “retirement” of bone cell precursors By studying mice in late adolescence, Johns Hopkins University researchers have discovered that the rapid bone growth associated with puberty is slowed not only by fewer cartilage cell divisions but also by the “aging” of bone cell precursor cells. After investigating the signaling molecules that promote this transition, the scientists conclude that some weak and brittle bone conditions in both children and adults may be due […]