Tag Archive: News

Huffman Splane Emerging Nurse Scholars Forum 2018


The Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing Huffman Splane Emerging Scholars Forum supports early career development and international networking of emerging nursing scholars who are embarking on a research focused career. The Huffman Splane Emerging Nurse Scholars Forum is supported by a generous endowment from Dr. Verna Huffman Splane, a pioneer in nursing in Canada who held a deep conviction that nurses should be taught that they are part of a global profession. Bloomberg Nursing is widely recognized as a research-intensive environment that promotes education and scholarship in nursing. Selected through a peer review application process, participants will be invited to … Continue reading

ICTR in the News: Johns Hopkins Experts Create Opioid Prescribing Guidelines For 20 Common Surgical Procedures


The following article contains contributions from ICTR researcher Martin Makary, M.D., M.P.H., a professor of surgery and health policy expert at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. A Johns Hopkins expert panel of health care providers and patients have announced what is, to their knowledge, the nation’s first set of operation-specific opioid prescribing guidelines. The guidelines are based on the premise that opioid prescribing limits should be based on the operation performed rather than a blanket approach. The ranges offered for each of 20 common operations generally call for reductions from the current rates of opioid prescription, and the … Continue reading

The Johns Hopkins Hospital Ranked #3 Nationally by U.S. News


The hospital ranks #1 overall in Maryland, among nation’s top 10 in 13 specialty areas BALTIMORE – The Johns Hopkins Hospital is ranked #3 in the nation out of nearly 4,700 hospitals reviewed for U.S. News & World Report’s 2018–19 Best Hospitals list, which was released today. The publication also ranked 13 specialties at Johns Hopkins among the top 10 in the nation. This new overall ranking — along with the U.S. News #8 national ranking of Johns Hopkins Children’s Center — maintains Johns Hopkins’ standing as the nation’s top-ranked hospital for patients of all ages. In a congratulatory video … Continue reading

Additional Patient Information Now Available in the Epic in Basket Message


The “Epic In Basket” message, which notifies study teams if a research participant has been admitted to either the emergency department or as an inpatient, is getting an upgrade. In addition to the participant’s name, medical record number and other demographics, admission information will now include: the study in which the patient is participating the chief complaint and diagnosis (if documented) more detailed admission information any notes posted in the problem list A screenshot of the new “Epic In Basket” message is below.  You can also download it here. For questions and or concerns, please contact the Epic research team … Continue reading

Study Reveals Broad ‘Genetic Architectures’ of Traits and Diseases


Cognitive traits and psychiatric disorders stand apart, typically being influenced by tens of thousands of gene variants Scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have developed a powerful method for characterizing the broad patterns of genetic contributions to traits and diseases. The new method provides a “big picture” of genetic influences that should be particularly helpful in designing future genetic studies and understanding potential for genetic risk prediction. The scientists, in a study published on Aug. 13 in the journal Nature Genetics, mined existing data from genetic studies and used novel statistical techniques to obtain estimates of the numbers of … Continue reading

ICTR in the News: Surprise Finding For Very Sick Elderly, Lighter Sedation Won’t Drop Risk of Postoperative Delirium, Study Suggests


The following article profiles work performed by ICTR researcher Frederick Sieber, M.D., professor of anesthesiology and critical care medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say a study designed to see if reducing the amount of anesthesia reduces the risk of postoperative delirium in older patients   surprisingly found that lighter sedation failed to do so in severely ill people undergoing hip fracture repair. But the study of 200 men and women also showed that for those in relatively better health, deep sedation more than doubled the risk of postoperative delirium compared with those having … Continue reading

Elderly Patients On Dialysis Have A High Risk of Dementia


Study of more than 350,000 patients hints that end-stage kidney disease patients need better cognitive monitoring and dementia prevention measures Older kidney disease patients who are sick enough to require the blood-filtering treatment known as dialysis are at high risk of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, according to a study led by scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The study, published Aug. 9 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society for Nephrology, found evidence that older kidney disease patients had a substantially higher risk of being diagnosed with dementia than community-dwelling older adults. “The dementia risk in this population … Continue reading

Support Increases When Opioid ‘Safe Consumption Sites’ Called ‘Overdose Prevention Sites’


Boosting public support could encourage more locations to consider adopting this harm-reduction strategy to combat the U.S. opioid epidemic “Safe consumption sites,” where people can use pre-obtained drugs with medically trained personnel on hand to treat overdoses, garner higher public support when they are called “overdose prevention sites,” according to a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The researchers, in a study published on August 8 in the American Journal of Public Health, surveyed representative national samples of Americans and found that only 29 percent of respondents were in favor of “safe consumption sites,” but 45 percent … Continue reading

ICTR in the News: Microbes Go Dark To Stay Warm in Cooler Climates


The following article profiles work performed by ICTR researcher Arturo Casadevall, MD, PhD, the Alfred & Jill Sommer Professor and Chair of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, who utilized our Biostatistics Consulting service. Researchers find evidence that yeasts use heat-capturing pigments that could be a factor in their survival—and in global warming, too Microorganisms in colder climates darken themselves to capture more heat from the sun and improve their ability to survive, according to a study from scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The scientists, in a study to be published in Current … Continue reading

UHI Community-Driven Research Day, Friday, October 12, 2018


Join The Johns Hopkins Urban Health Institute as they work to foster collaborative research for optimal community health outcomes Enjoy an afternoon of networking and having your research needs heard at Community-Driven Research Day! Community-based organizations will have the opportunity to discuss their research needs with interested faculty and students, identify potential collaborations, and become aware of funding resources for collaborative research. Baltimore-based community organizations, city agencies, faculty, and students are encouraged to attend! Where: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Feinstone Hall E2030, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205 When: Friday, October 12, 2018 | 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. The deadline … Continue reading

Research Tip: Caregivers Lack Medications, Knowledge to Manage Baltimore Children’s Asthma


In a new study, Johns Hopkins researchers found that fewer than half of interviewed caregivers for Baltimore preschool children with asthma were prepared to administer medication for routine management or emergency response to a child’s chronic condition. A report on the study was published Aug. 7 in Pediatrics. For the study, researchers defined medication readiness as the physical availability in the home of medications that were not expired and had remaining doses. In addition, the researchers asked if each caregiver could correctly identify whether a medication was a rescue or controller medication, and if the caregiver could state any dosing … Continue reading